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The Plus – A Note from Mike

Michael Reader

My wife Pat and I took a U-Haul truck of “stuff” to our daughter Tina’s place in NYC earlier in the month.  Not exactly the way I prefer to see America, but it needed to be done.  After hauling all her stuff up two flights of narrow stairs in the heat, we were all in need of some good food.

We went for lunch at Joseph Leonard, a cozy seven-table bistro and bar, located
at the heart of West Village, and I must tell you it was great.  The atmosphere was relaxed, the food was excellent, and the service was beyond par.  It is what we, at Precision Plus, call
THE PLU
S.

The brainchild behind Joseph Leonard is Gabriel Stulman, a fellow
UW – Madison grad, who runs a hell of a restaurant.   There were plenty of Wisconsin themes in the restaurant and all the staff clearly understood customer service:  Michael and Logan, and Grand Rapids’ “Big Guy” in the kitchen, made it a memorable experience.

Gabriel Stulman, who named the restaurant after both his grandfathers, got his inspiration from Madison’s Café Montmartre, a bistro where he tended bar while in school.  “Here I am,” he said, “a guy from Wisconsin who wanted to work with a bunch of his friends from Wisconsin.”  He’s kept his promise, as most of his staff comes from the Upper Midwest.

I drew some parallels between what they are doing and what we are doing here at Precision Plus  We also strive to always deliver THE PLUS to our customers:  Quality products at a reasonable price, experienced design engineers and caring customer service reps.  I strongly believe THE PLUS is what keeps satisfied customers coming back.  And as we continue to expand by adding space and equipment, we know that THE PLUS we deliver must remain intact.

In the two or so years since Gabriel Stulman first opened Joseph Leonard,  he has opened three more restaurants in West Village under the “Little Wisco” umbrella:  Jeffrey’s Grocery, Fedora (a former speakeasy), and Perla.  These are all unpretentious neighborhood joints that, according to some, “exude Wisconsin friendliness” and consistently deliver THE PLUS.

By the way, a Bloody with the beer chaser had me hooked from the beginning.  We’ll be back for more.

A Note From Mike Reader, President of Precision Plus

Michael Reader

As we enter the second half of the year I am happy to report we have many good things happening here at Precision Plus  All and all, it was a successful first half with sales surpassing those of last year, and the addition of our 4th Miyano ABX lathe.  Our customers remain optimistic and continue to ask us to take on more work from them.  It is a testament to the hard work of all our staff when I hear a long-standing customer ask me “we need to resource a package of parts, how much more can you take on?”.  Especially with existing customers, we have developed a trust that ensures them that we know what we are doing and that we will produce what they ask for.  As the degree of difficulty in developing and manufacturing new components continues to increase, we understand that the complexity of the part will make a difference in our customers’ profitability and efficiency.

We are continually improving “embedding” ourselves with our customers’ product engineering teams, so as to add more value and be in the best position to transition from prototype to production.  Our customers love this because they can understand cost and manufacturing challenges early on in a design project.  We love this because we want to make the entire process seamless. Bill Wells, our Sales and Engineering Manager, devotes much of his time working with these engineers.  It’s a time-consuming proposition, but an investment in both our futures.

Since the beginning of the year, we have taken on over 100 new jobs, not only from new customer-partners, but from our existing customer-partners from a variety of industries, including pneumatic and hydraulic, aerospace, industrial, automotive, medical and dental and movie and still motion product manufacturers.

This organic growth, coupled with new opportunities developed through our website and media efforts have us plenty busy.  As I mentioned earlier, we continue to reinvest in capital equipment and technology to support our customer’s needs, and remain committed to ongoing improvements.

However, while we can put all the new equipment we want on the floor, it is the difficulty in finding/developing skilled machinists that will constrain our growth moving forward.  This is a real problem for us, our industry and our country that requires a true Manufacturing Training Plan.  We are addressing this issue on many levels.  Locally, we are participating in trade school and college programs designed to instruct young and/or unemployed individuals in the crucial trade of manufacturing.  On a national level, with the PMPA, we are talking to Congress and Senate leaders in order to create a mind shift with respect to training younger people in the trades, so they can fill in the open spots that retiring Baby Boomers are leaving at a rapid pace.  The goal is to bring manufacturing back to the U.S.

Reach out to me with any questions, suggestions or comments you may have!  My door is always open.

Mike Reader
President

 

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